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WHITE TONGUE, WHY IS MY TONGUE WHITE ? CHECK WITH THE BEST DENTIST IN SUMMERLIN

WHITE TONGUE, WHY IS MY TONGUE WHITE?

CHECK WITH THE BEST DENTIST IN SUMMERLIN

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Do you have a white tongue?

YOU NEED TO SEE YOUR SUMMERLIN DENTIST TO HAVE IT CHECKED

White tongue is a symptom in which part, or all of your tongue develops a thick white covering. Bad breath, a hairy tongue, and discomfort are all possible side effects. Although a white tongue can be unsightly, it is usually harmless and only lasts a short time.

OVERVIEW

What is the meaning of white tongue?

When your tongue is coated in a thick white coating, it is known as a "white tongue." This coating might cover your entire tongue, the back section of your tongue, or it can appear in patches. You may also experience a terrible taste, unpleasant breath, or redness in your tongue.

White tongue is occasionally associated with a condition known as hairy tongue. However, the thick fur-like coating you perceive isn't hair; it's your papillae, which are little bumps that house your taste buds.

If you irritate your tongue or get an infection, white tongue can develop over time or appear abruptly. White tongue can be caused by a variety of factors, but it normally fades away after a few weeks. You can also use a mouthwash that is anti-fungal.

However,

if your white tongue persists for more than a few weeks, or if you experience pain or difficulty eating or speaking, you should contact your Summerlin Dentist for a diagnosis and treatment.

CAUSES THAT MAY BE INVOLVED

Why does my tongue appear to be white?

Bacteria, detritus (such as food and sugar), and dead cells are stuck between the papillae on the surface of your tongue, resulting in a white tongue. These string-like papillae enlarge and swell, becoming inflammatory in some cases. This is what causes the white patch on your tongue.

A white tongue can be produced by a variety of disorders, that we have seen at Summerlin Dental Solutions including:

Leukoplakia is a frequent disorder characterized by an overgrowth of cells in the mouth's lining. A white elevated patch on your tongue is formed when these cells interact with the protein keratin (present in your hair). When you drink alcohol or smoke tobacco, you might often obtain this illness by irritating your mouth and tongue. There are occasions when there is no evident cause. Leukoplakia is normally harmless, but it can develop into something more serious years or even decades after it initially appears.

Oral lichen planus is a long-term inflammatory mouth condition known as oral lichen planus. It's brought on by an immune system malfunction (your body's defense against pathogens) and other tiny assaults. This is a condition that you cannot pass on to others.

Geographic tongue is a condition that occurs while the skin of your tongue is regrowing. Parts of your tongue's upper layer of skin shed too quickly, causing painful red spots that are easily infected. Meanwhile, some sections of your tongue get white when they remain in place for too long. You can't pass on your geographic tongue to others.

Oral thrush is a yeast infection that occurs in the mouth and is caused by the Candida yeast (fungus). Candida is generally found in your mouth, but it can cause an issue if it over develops.

Who is the most vulnerable to white tongue?

You're more likely to have white tongue or oral thrush if you have certain health concerns, use certain substances, or have certain habits (an infection causing a white patch on your tongue).

 

These are some of the risk factors:

Having diabetes

Being extremely young or extremely elderly. Infants and toddlers are the most prevalent victims of oral thrush.

Antibiotics are used (they can cause a yeast infection inside your mouth).

Consuming a diet devoid of fruits and vegetables (iron or vitamin B12). It can also be caused by eating a diet high in soft foods.

Fever or a weakened immune system.

Wearing dentures or piercing your tongue with sharp things are both bad ideas.

Oral hygiene is a problem.

Taking a deep breath via your mouth.

Dehydration, a dry mouth induced by a medical condition, or the use of drugs (like muscle relaxers).

Tobacco use (smoking or chewing).

Having more than one alcoholic beverage every day.

cancer treatments.

Hypothyroidism is a condition that affects the thyroid gland (an underactive thyroid gland causing poor metabolism).

 Is it true that tongue piercings result in a white tongue?

You may see a white coating on your tongue if you (or your teen) recently had a tongue piercing. It's just natural bacterial growth that antifungal mouthwashes like Nystatin (like Nystop®) can help with. A white ring of tissue may appear around both sides of your piercing, but this is simply how your tongue heals from a cut.

Because your papillae (those small bumps on your tongue) are elevated, debris and microorganisms (food, plaque, and bacteria) can build on a vast surface area within your mouth. Terrible breath and a bad taste in your mouth are almost probably caused by this buildup. Gum disease can also be caused by a white tongue.

These are some of the causes of white tongue. We will discuss some of the treatments in another Summerlin Dental Solutions blog.

Get to Know the Dentist

Dr. Marianne Cohan was voted The Best Dentist/ Dental Office and Best Cosmetic Dentist from The Las Vegas Review Journal in 2020 and 2021. She received her Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1992.

With an emphasis on cosmetic, complete makeovers and implant dentistry, Dr. Cohan is committed to continuing education and feels that we never stop learning.  Dr. Cohan takes pride in using high powered magnification to perform minimally invasive restorative dentistry. She uses all of the latest technological advances including digital radiography, digital photography, computer simulations and high-resolution pictures of proposed treatment on 55 inch screens.  She also utilizes CBCT (cone beam) and laser technology.  Dr. Cohan is always available to her patients and is available for any dental emergency.

CLICK HERE TO SCHEDULE APPOINTMENT

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851 S Rampart Blvd #230, Las Vegas, NV 89145 | (702) 341-9160
851 S Rampart Blvd #230, Las Vegas, NV 89145 | (702) 341-9160
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